Working at NIOO

With more than 200 staff and students, the Netherlands Institute of Ecology (NIOO-KNAW) is one of the largest research institutes of the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences (KNAW). Most are from the world of (international) science: professors, researchers and PhD students. They are joined by indispensable support staff in HR, Science Communication, Finances, ICT and Facilities. Everyone makes their own passionate contribution towards a more liveable world. Does that sound like you?
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© Perro de Jong / NIOO-KNAW

Diversity & inclusion

We set great store by a working environment in which everyone can feel welcome and appreciated. Together, we strive for an inclusive culture that embraces difference.

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Werken bij (Diversiteit)
© Perro de Jong / NIOO-KNAW

Facts and figures

  • Staff & students
    >200
  • Nationalities
    >30
  • Women/men
    52% / 48%
  • Research projects
    >120

Vacancies

  1. Medewerker Receptie

    Category
    Position
    Bezorg jij als onze nieuwe Medewerker Receptie de bezoekers en medewerkers van het NIOO een warm welkom?
  2. PhD position: Parasites of harmful cyanobacteria

    Category
    Position
    In this multi-approach PhD position you will investigate how climate change, fungal parasites and cyanobacteria interact.
  3. NICHES onderzoeksmedewerker

    Category
    Position
    Do you want to join the interdisciplinary project NICHES and increase understanding of waterquality in an urban environment?
  4. Medewerker Receptie & Facilitair

    Category
    Position
    Ben jij servicegericht, gestructureerd, communicatief vaardig en op zoek naar een afwisselende baan? Dan ben jij misschien wel de nieuwe medewerker Receptie & Facilitair van het NIOO.

Internships

  1. Can Rewilding protect primary productivity from Climate Change?

    Category
    Internship
    Rewilding is a form of nature restoration that gives room for natural processes so as to regenerate self-sustaining resilient ecosystems. As such, rewilding might buffer ecosystems processes and functions against the impact of Climate Change. Primary productivity is a key ecosystem process underpinning the dynamics of ecosystems, yet we lack knowledge on whether rewilding might protect primary productivity against the threat of Climate Change.
  2. The effects of Rewilding on woody-plant regeneration and open-woodland mosaics

    Category
    Internship
    Rewilding is a form of nature restoration that gives room for natural processes so as to regenerate self-sustaining resilient ecosystems. Myriads of rewilding initiatives have emerged across the world over the last decades, yet many of the outcomes of rewilding have not been fully empirically ascertained. A particularly controversial outcome of rewilding concerns its potential impact on woody-plant regeneration, shrub encroachment and the maintenance of open-woodland mosaics with relatively high levels of structural heterogeneity.
  3. The impact of Rewilding on aboveground carbon sequestration

    Category
    Internship
    The relentless pace of Climate Change has triggered a race to devise effective ways to mitigate Climate Change by sequestering carbon from the atmosphere. Rewilding, a form of nature restoration that aims to restore ecosystems by enhancing natural processes, has the potential to contribute to these mitigation efforts via aboveground and/or belowground carbon sequestration (e.g. in the vegetation and the soil). Yet, we still lack estimates on how much carbon can be captured through rewilding in different ecosystem types and how this changes as rewilding progresses.
  4. Rewilding ecological interactions

    Category
    Internship
    Rewilding is a form of nature restoration that gives room for natural processes so as to regenerate self-sustaining resilient ecosystems. Most evaluations of rewilding success focus on common biodiversity metrics, paying less attention to species interactions and community assembly processes. On the other hand, the structure and intensity of species interactions determine the potential resilience of ecological communities against disturbances. Hence, understanding how rewilding affects and restores ecological interactions is a critical step towards evaluating rewiliding success.
  5. Pumping carbon into soils through Rewilding

    Category
    Internship
    The relentless pace of Climate Change has triggered a race to devise effective ways to mitigate Climate Change by sequestering carbon from the atmosphere. Rewilding, a form of nature restoration that aims to restore ecosystems by enhancing natural processes, has the potential to contribute to these mitigation efforts via aboveground and/or belowground carbon sequestration (e.g. in the vegetation and the soil). Yet, we still lack estimates on how much carbon can be captured through rewilding in different ecosystem types and how this changes as rewilding progresses.
  6. How do nutrients and temperature affect cyanobacterial bloom toxicity?

    Category
    Internship
    Toxic cyanobacterial blooms threaten freshwater quality, made worse by climate change and eutrophication. The toxicity of these blooms depends not only on cyanobacteria quantity but also on the presence potentially toxin-producing species and genotypes, and their varied toxin production.
  7. Climate-proof soils by steering soil and residue microbiomes - ClipsMicro

    Category
    Internship
    Are you ready to dive into the world of microbial ecology applied to agricultural research? Join us in the "ClipsMicro" project at the Netherlands Institute of Ecology (NIOO) and play a crucial role in developing nature-based agricultural management strategies.
  8. Modeling yeast metabolism in plant phyllosphere

    Category
    Internship
    In this project, our primary focus will be on delving into the physiology of these less-researched yeast strains residing in the phyllosphere using computational tools, reconstruct a genome-scale metabolic model and predict carbon utilization.
  9. Fieldwork and data analysis on Great Tits

    Category
    Internship
    Do you want to have an interesting internship that involves handling birds and a lot of field work? In that case we are looking for you!
  10. HBO internship: Molecular and isotope probing of soil virus ecology

    Category
    Internship
    The project offers opportunities for a HBO intern who is interested in applying molecular techniques to environmental samples, in an exciting area of soil ecology.
  11. MSc internship / thesis project: Bacteriophages as drivers of soil biogeochemistry

    Category
    Internship
    In this project, we investigate the soil virosphere to assess phage interactions with soil materials, host bacteria, and soil fauna, with the aim of understanding their influence on carbon and nitrogen cycling.
  12. Ecology of flower bulb breeding birds

    Category
    Internship
    Where biodiversity loss has on average been halted in nature reserves, biodiversity of rural areas keeps declining. The larger aim of this project (project Living Lab B7) is to enhance biodiversity in the rural part of The Flower Bulb Region.
  13. Microbial competition and cooperation in the phyllosphere

    Category
    Internship
    Suitable for Master students for at least six months
  14. Exploiting foliar yeasts for fungal pathogen inhibition and mycotoxin degradation

    Category
    Internship
    Suitable for Master students for at least six months
  15. Sperm biology and evolution (thesis/internship projects)

    Category
    Internship
    Sperm are critical to successful fertilisation in sexually reproducing animals. The function of sperm – to find and fertilise ova – is universal throughout the animal kingdom, yet the sperm cell is the most morphologically diverse cell type known.
  16. Master student in ecological genomics

    Category
    Internship
    Evidence is accumulating that epigenetic mechanisms can affect heritable phenotypic traits and thus, may play a role in plant adaptation. However, little is known about the magnitude and relevance of functional epi-allelic variation in natural plant populations.
  17. Manipulating your victim: the adaptive significance of host usurpation by the endoparasitoids Cotesia glomerata and Cotesia congregata

    Category
    Internship
    Parasitoid wasps are known to exhibit two strategies for exploiting host resources during development. The first is for the parasitoid larvae to consume the entire host (such as a caterpillar) before pupation. However, some parasitoids consume only a small fraction of the host during development. In this case, the mature parasitoid larvae emerge through the sides of the still-living host and pupate on, or next to it. In some instances, the caterpillar may remain alive for up to two weeks after parasitoid pupation and remain very close to the parasitoid cocoons.
  18. Lifetime reproductive success in two secondary hyperparasitoid wasps, Lysibia nana and Gelis agilis

    Category
    Internship
    Hyperparasitoids are insects that develop on, or in another parasitoid species. Secondary hyperparasitoids attack primary parasitoid hosts (usually their cocoons) that have already emerged from the secondary herbivore host. In spite of their potential importance in affecting the dynamics of plant-herbivore-parasitoid systems (over three trophic levels), little is still known about the biology and life-history of secondary hyperparasitoids (in the fourth trophic level).
  19. How do soil micro-organisms affect the chances of woodland expansions during water pulses?

    Category
    Internship
    Woodland expansion in arid environments occurs episodically during wet years. Recent research indicates that tree seedling growth rate and survival is crucial to explain the differences across ecosystems and that soil microorganisms likely play a crucial role.
  20. Coping with a changing world: the consequences of rapid evolutionary adaptation to combinations of multiple stressors

    Category
    Internship
    Rapid evolutionary adaptation is increasingly considered as an important mechanism allowing animals to adapt to a rapidly changing world. Our research has shown that rotifers, a type of very common freshwater zooplankton, are able to adapt to poor food quality or enhanced salt concentrations in not more than a few months. At this moment, we investigate how rotifers cope with combinations of stressors. More specifically, we run evolution experiments in the laboratory exposing populations to the metal Cu and high temperatures, with the aim to study how adaptation to one stressor impedes or enhances the response to the other stressor.
  21. Comparing insect communities on native Dutch wild mustard plants over a growing season

    Category
    Internship
    Host-plant suitability and quality for herbivore (and possibly natural enemy) development is determined by the presence of sufficient levels of nutrients and concentrations of adverse metabolites such as specific secondary plant compounds and digestibility reducers. In nature, these characteristics are dynamic and can change within individual plants over the course of a growing season. Many species of multivoltine insects (insects have more than one generation per year) are known to attack short-lived annual plants i.e. plants that are present for only 1or 2 months in the field. These short-lived plants may germinate and grow at different times and/or locations during the growing season. In this situation, each herbivore generation is faced with the challenge of leaving the natal patch to find and lay eggs on a different plant species that may be growing some distance from where they themselves developed. At the same time, the quality of the different food plant species on which they feed and grow over the spring and summer seasons may also be highly variable.

HR team

This is our Human Resources team