Press releases

Each year, some 40 of our experts are in the news. From toxic cyanobacteria to soil biodiversity and bird personality. For press inquiries, please contact Froukje Rienks,  head of PR & Science Communication.

Search results

  1. Pharmaceutical residues increasingly disrupt aquatic life

    Press release
    It's a hidden global change: away from the public eye, residues of medicines in water have been causing increasing disruption. They can kill aquatic animals, and play havoc with their food web and reproductive cycle. An international team of researchers led by the NIOO makes an urgent case for better wastewater treatment and biodegradable pharmaceuticals.
    Watervlo
  2. Clever songbird's genome may hold key to evolution of learning

    Press release
    The great tit has revealed its genetic code, offering new insight into how species adapt to a changing planet. Initial findings suggest that epigenetics – what’s on rather than what’s in the gene – may have played a key role in the evolution of the ability to learn. And not just that of birds...
    Koolmees
  3. Extinction of Pleistocene herbivores induced major vegetation and landscape changes

    Press release
    The extinction of large herbivores such as mammoths could explain massive prehistoric changes in vegetation and landscape structure, with major implications for our understanding of present-day ecosystems. Modern and paleo-ecologists joined forces in an international study led by the Netherlands Institute of Ecology (NIOO-KNAW). The results are being published online by PNAS this week.
    Pleistocene
  4. Dig in with us on Soil Animal Day!

    Press release
    What soil creatures are living right under our feet? Find out in your own backyard on 4 October - or in your local park, on your green roof or even your balcony (!) - as the Netherlands Institute of Ecology (NIOO-KNAW) organises the first-ever 'Soil Animal Day', together with the Centre for Soil Ecology (CSE).
    KeverMiddel
  5. Wageningen to mark International Year of Soils with range of activities

    Press release
    The soil expertise found at Wageningen enjoys international recognition. So it is only fitting that in 2015, the International Year of Soils, numerous activities are taking place in Wageningen. On Monday 26 January, various Wageningen-based institutions and organisations laid a plaque in the Walk of Fame on campus to kick off the IYS. The gesture symbolises their collaboration in the new Wageningen Soil Network.
    Wageningsebodem
  6. Wadden Sea report: breeding birds in the danger zone

    Press release
    ZEIST/WAGENINGEN/NIJMEGEN - Birds that breed in the Dutch Wadden Sea are facing serious problems, according to a new report that brings together all available data from the past two decades. The report was launched at the inaugural symposium of the new Centre for Avian Population Studies (CAPS).
    IMG_7967
  7. Research among mallards proves: migratory birds don't import bird flu but contract it here

    Press release
    06/10/2014 Migratory birds are often blamed for spreading avian influenza. But new research proves for a specific flu type that instead of importing the virus into the Netherlands, migratory mallards actually contract it here. NIOO-researcher Jacintha van Dijk defends her thesis on the topic at Utrecht University on Wednesday.
    gemaakt door Jacintha van Dijk
  8. Research among mallards proves: migratory birds don't import bird flu but contract it here

    Press release
    Migratory birds are often blamed for spreading avian influenza. But new research proves for a specific flu type that instead of importing the virus into the Netherlands, migratory mallards actually contract it here. NIOO-researcher Jacintha van Dijk defends her thesis on the topic at Utrecht University on Wednesday.
    OnderzoekEend
  9. Migratory animals create worldwide ecosystem

    Press release
    WAGENINGEN – In the animal kingdom, travel is key: that is the conclusion of Silke Bauer’s research in a nutshell. The NIOO-ecologist and an Australian colleague list the numerous species that migrate from one location to another. According to the two researchers, the effects of these migrations on world ecosystems have been overlooked. Time to give the billions of geese, locusts, butterflies, herrings and wildebeest that wander the globe their proper due.
    Wilde dieren
  10. 'Excellent' rating for NIOO's Avian Migration Centre

    Press release
    WAGENINGEN - NIOO-KNAW's Centre for Avian Migration and Demography has ringed birds and studied their migration patterns for over a century. In its first-ever peer review, the Centre has been rated 'excellent'.
    houtduiven
  11. NIOO plants 'food forest'

    Press release
    WAGENINGEN – The Netherlands Institute of Ecology is to have its own 'food forest'. Researchers and students have begun planting a variety of fruits, vegetables and other edible plant species in the grounds around the NIOO building. No fertilizers are being used: the principles of a natural forest apply. In the future, fruits from the agroforest will be served in the NIOO canteen.
    Mensenbuiten
  12. 'Neighbour-plants' determine insects' feeding choices

    Press release
    WAGENINGEN – Insects are choosier than you might think: whether or not they end up feeding on a particular plant depends on much more than just the species to which that plant belongs. The quality of the individual plant is an important factor as well. As is the variety of other plants growing around it. But what, ultimately, makes an insect choose one plant over another?

    JKK