Microbial Farming to increase plant productivity

Project 2018–Present
Soil microbial farming to increase plant productivity: reducing nutrient inputs to increase plant-microbe interactions and managing soil microbial diversity

Details

Department
Microbial Ecology
Research group
Kuramae Group
Funding
TKI Topsector Tuinbouw & Uitgangsmaterialen grant number TU17008

Plant-growth promoting microbes (PGPM) are alternative to traditional fertilizers for enhancing plant productivity and improving soil quality without environmental pollution. The use of PGPM in agriculture has been hampered by a lack of reproducible results and the difficulty of transferring this technology to the field. This inconsistent success primarily reflects competition or resistance of the original soil microbiome to inoculants, as well as the negative effects of management practices such as fertilization on plant interactions with the soil microbiome and the efficiency of ecosystem services delivered by PGPM. However, the influence of the indigenous soil microbiome on plants remains largely unknown. Here we investigate the tripartite, PGPM-plant-soil microbiome interaction in plant quality and productivity using state-of-the-art ‘omics’ and bioinformatics approaches to investigate facilitation (positive interactions) and competition (negative interactions) by both microbes and PGPM within the plant realized niche following gradients of both soil diversity and nutrient availability.

Selection of Beneficial Microbes with Plant Growth Promotion Traits
Selection of Beneficial Microbes with Plant Growth Promotion Traits
Microbial Farming
Test the Stress Gradient Hypothesis in Microbial Ecology: increase PGPM interaction efficiency by manipulating nutrient concentration.
partners
Partners

Details

Department
Microbial Ecology
Research group
Kuramae Group
Funding
TKI Topsector Tuinbouw & Uitgangsmaterialen grant number TU17008

Experts