Paulien klein Gunnewiek

Ing. Paulien klein Gunnewiek

Laboratory Assistant
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Visiting Address

Droevendaalsesteeg 10
6708 PB Wageningen

+31 (0) 317 47 34 00

The Netherlands

About

Paulien klein Gunnewiek (1966) graduated as microbial technician at the RHMAS in Wageningen in 1988. From 1988 on, she worked at the NIOO at the department ME as a research-assistent together with professor Dr. W. de Boer.

Biography

Paulien klein Gunnewiek (1966) graduated as microbial technician at the RHAS in Wageningen in 1988. From 1988 on, she worked at the NIOO at the department ME as a research-assistent together with professor Dr. W. de Boer. She has experience with microbial, chemical and molecular techniques. Together with prof. Dr. W. de Boer and associating pHD's /post docs, she worked on a lot of different topics like (acid)nitrification, fungi-eating bacteria (Collimonas), wood degrading bacteria, fungal-bacterial interactions and Biocontrol. She is also responsible for the fungi- and bacteria-collection of the ME department. Since 2019 she is Biosafety officer at NIOO.

Research groups

CV

Employment

  • 1988–Present
    Technician at NIOO
  • 2019–Present
    Biosafety Officer at NIOO

Education

1984–1988
RHMAS Wageningen Microbiology

Projects & collaborations

Projects

  • Insectloop: Microbes involved in the decomposition of rest-streams of insect production

    Project 2018–2022
    This is a sub-project of a WUR-NIOO project entitled "Closing the loop: exploiting sustainable insect production to improve soil, crop and animal health", coordinated by Prof. Marcel Dicke. Insects can transform waste streams into high-value proteins for food and feed. Consequently, insects provide valuable contributions to a circular economy. The project aims to investigate the valorisation of the rest-stream of insect production, i.e. moulting skins and faeces (‘frass’) to enhance soil health and crop health (https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tplants.2022.01.007).
    In the NIOO project, we study the decomposition rate of frass and moulting skins of three insects species (black soldier fly, mealworm, cricket) in arable soil as well as the composition of the fungal and bacterial decomposers. In addition, we study if the insect materials, which are rich in chitin, can be used to control soil-borne fungal plant diseases.
    Bioassay with insect materials